Shams Tabrizi

Shams-i-Tabrīzī (Persian: شمس تبریزی‎‎) or Shams al-Din Mohammad (1185–1248) was an Iranian Sunni Muslim, who is credited as the spiritual instructor of Mewlānā Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhi, also known as Rumi and is referenced with great reverence in Rumi’s poetic collection, in particular Diwan-i Shams-i Tabrīzī (The Works of Shams of Tabriz). Tradition holds that Shams taught Rumi in seclusion in Konya for a period of forty days, before fleeing for Damascus. The tomb of Shams-i Tabrīzī was recently nominated to be a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Born: 1185, Tabriz, Iran220px-Shamse_Tabrizi
Died: 1248, Khoy, Iran
Buried: Shams-e Tabrizi Tomb, Khoy
Parents: Imam Ala al-Din
Books: Discourse of Shams Tabrizi, Me & Rumi, Rumi’s sun

Life

According to Sipah Salar, a devotee and intimate friend of Rumi who spent forty days with him, Shams was the son of the Imam Ala al-Din. In a work entitled Manāqib al-‘arifīn (Eulogies of the Gnostics), Aflaki names a certain ‘Ali as the father of Shams-i Tabrīzī and his grandfather as Malikdad. Apparently basing his calculations on Haji Bektash Veli’s Maqālāt (Conversations), Aflaki suggests that Shams arrived in Konya at the age of sixty years. However, various scholars have questioned Aflaki’s reliability.

Shams received his education in Tabriz and was a disciple of Baba Kamal al-Din Jumdi. Before meeting Rumi, he apparently traveled from place to place weaving baskets and selling girdles for a living. Despite his occupation as a weaver, Shams received the epithet of “the embroiderer” (zarduz) in various biographical accounts including that of the Persian historian Dawlatshah. This however, is not the occupation listed by Haji Bektash Veli in the Maqālat and was rather the epithet given to the Ismaili Imam Shams al-din Muhammad, who worked as an embroiderer while living in anonymity in Tabriz. The transference of the epithet to the biography of Rumi’s mentor suggests that this Imam’s biography must have been known to Shams-i Tabrīzī’s biographers. The specificities of how this transference occurred, however, are not yet known.

Shams’ first encounter with Rumi

Death

According to contemporary Sufi tradition, Shams Tabrizi mysteriously disappeared: some say he was killed by close disciples of Mowlana Jalaluddin Rumi who were jealous of the close relationship between Rumi and Shams, But according to many certain evidences he left Konya and died in Khoy where he was buried. There are several sites that claim to his grave, one in a remote region of the Karakoram in Northern Pakistan at a place called Ziarat, near the village Shimshall.[Sultan Walad]], Rumi’s son, in his Walad-Nama mathnawi just mentions that Shams mysteriously disappeared from Konya with no more specific details.

Shams Tabrizi’s tomb in Khoy, beside a tower monument in a memorial park, has been nominated as a World Cultural Heritage Center by UNESCO.

800px-Tomb_of_Shams_Tabrizi_2
Tomb of Shams Tabrizi
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Tomb of Shams Tabrizi
Bowl_of_Reflections,_early_13th_century
Bowl of Reflections, early 13th century. Brooklyn Museum
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Tomb of Shams Tabrizi

Source: Wikipedia

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3 thoughts on “Shams Tabrizi

  1. I should stop updating this list; I keep falling lower and lower ; ) If anyone else is competing without powerups, please let me know and I’ll add your name to the lists. Is anyone else in the top 10 not using powerups? It still appears to me that most people are using powerups. At the moment the nonuopwer-p competition seems to be (number in () is ranking overall): 1 (10) 2614940 Bigreddawgs 2 (11) 2611120 Just Joan 3 (12) 2597800 Sal 4 (15) 2567460 Yoruichi 5 (16) 2563390 mvnla2 (me) 6 (23) 2379720 Laurence (only 28 scores entered) Kartflyer (but no scores entered)

  2. so sad – for some reasons none of your photos are uploading – some kind of server error probably and likely temporary – have seen the photo of the burning ship elsewhere though and I understand how you must be feeling.

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